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Reclaiming your time is about adding value for anyone who is in business and will be explored at daily TEDx style talks at the Henty Machinery Field Days. 

Small business accountant, Clayton Wood, Business Edge Advisors, Albury, will present daily talks at 9.30am at site 350 Block I (opposite The Stump) and share some key mindsets on helping you to better prioritise your time. 

“Understanding where your time is wasted is a key step in the process so you can spend more time on the things that matter most,” Mr Wood said. 

“We all have the same number of hours in the day, but some people achieve so much more than others.

“You will always be busy, so you need to take steps to reclaim control of the time you have.

“The business and personal cost of doing so is too great.”

Mr Wood will share some strategies you can apply to help reclaim your time.

“What is the opportunity cost for you not re-prioritising your time – come and join us to find out,” he said.

Animal diseases, prevention and preparedness on your property will be a major focus of Local Land Services’ Henty Machinery Field Days activities this year.

General Manager of the Riverina region Ray Willis said NSW Local Land Services would have district veterinarians on hand to show landholders how to prepare a farm biosecurity plan to manage the threats of FMD and other animal diseases. 

“Our biosecurity officers can also provide advice on pest animal management options for your farm,” Mr Willis said.

The Local Land Services’ team will be available throughout the three days to provide advice on livestock health, animal feed requirements, stock management, crops and pastures, and pest animal control techniques. 

The team will also be able to provide advice and solutions on using native vegetation to protect native species habitat and create shelterbelts for livestock.

Local Land Services, Murray region General Manager Gary Rodda, said land management staff will be available to talk to landholders about managing native vegetation.

“Visitors to the Local Land Services display shed can also learn more about our travelling stock reserves and moving stock or chat with our customer services staff about how to lodge your annual land and stock return, get a property identification code or pay your rates,” Mr Rodda said.

“Our stand will be interactive and informative and our friendly staff are here to help.” 

Field day visitors will find the Local Land Services shed at site 311, at the corner of 5th Ag Place and 4th Farm Avenue. 

Southern NSW growers are dealing with vastly different seasonal conditions since the last time the Henty Machinery Field Days were able to go ahead in 2019. 

In response to current conditions, the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) plan to arm growers with the latest research on managing a wetter than normal season. 

Together with the NSW Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI), GRDC will host an on-site grower brunch at the field days on Thursday, September 22 at 10am to give local growers the opportunity to listen to seasonally relevant updates from researchers on things like input management, disease risk and varietal information to help them make more informed management decisions on farm. 

Northern Regional Panel members will also join the Henty brunch to talk with growers about local opportunities and constraints to ensure GRDC’s research, development and extension is aligning with grower feedback. 

GRDC senior regional manager Gillian Meppem said there would be plenty of up-to-date information, to help growers and advisers capitalise on the wet season, at the grower brunch and throughout the field days at the NSW DPI site. 

“GRDC and NSW DPI are aware that ongoing wet conditions have generated both issues and opportunities for growers in the region,” Ms Meppem said. 

“This brunch event is about bringing the latest information and research to growers and advisers so they can understand how it relates to their local region and whether they can implement change on farm to maximise their profitability.

“This will include understanding disease risk and how to manage it but will also look at cropping options and general farming systems information to help with future planning.

“GRDC staff and Panel look forward to catching up with Southern NSW producers at Henty and I strongly encourage all growers and advisers attending the field days to make time to attend the grower brunch and learn more about response options to the current to seasonal conditions.”

Places are limited and responses are required for catering, so please contact Deb Slinger from NSW DPI on 0427 026 207 to register. 

Growers looking for efficiency gains at harvest need to see the new John Deere X-Series in the flesh at Henty this year. 

At demo days late last year some lucky Hutcheon & Pearce customers got to see the new X9 go head-to-head with other harvesters and noted the new John Deere X-Series taking harvest to the next level. 

Able to harvest more hectares per day, more tonnes per hour with minimal losses and while maintaining performance long into the night, the X-Series is specifically designed for large-hectare farmers who need more harvesting capacity.

According to independent testing by the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (PAMI), when compared with equipment from other manufacturers, the X9 1100 with HD50R header delivered 28 per cent more harvesting capacity with no sacrifice in grain quality.

The new X-Series is the first major design change for a John Deere harvester in almost 25 years. The big change is moving from a single rotor combine to dual rotor, a system redesign that sees the threshing and separation mechanism in the middle of the machine. The result is between 30-70 per cent in productivity gain.

“The machine is wider, and the dual rotors and new separation and cleaning area means you can do double the speed and get off double the crop in the same amount of time, which is exactly what growers looking for in the narrow windows that we’ve between weather events, as we saw in 2021,” sales and marketing manager Andrew Watt said. 

“Before we saw it, we thought some of our crops in Australia, being a little bit lighter than say European crops and a little bit easier to thresh, wouldn't see the same sort of gains that they’ve seen elsewhere,” Mr Watt said.

“But after seeing the unbelievable productivity on our crops – lapping the competition in the same paddock with virtually zero grain loss out the back of the machine – it really speaks for itself.

“Add that to the price point, which is lower than we were expecting, and it all adds up to a cracking investment. 

“In fact, before the X9 was released, we thought it might be appropriate for maybe 10-15 per cent of our customers. After the demonstrations in Australia, Hutcheon & Pearce and John Deere Australia are now expecting that to be more like 40 per cent of the customer base requesting the X9.

“We’re definitely keen to show it off at harvest this year, particularly to those customers with big crops and bigger fronts. 

“It will also be of interest to those operators who’d benefit from reducing their fleet numbers, so those who may have three or more S-Series may be able to reduce that number with the X-Series.”

The H&P sales team is trained up and excited to talk about the X9. Ordering for MY23 delivery opens in August but production is expected to fill quickly. 

For more information on the X9 or to register your interest for a demo later in the year, talk to your local Sales representative at the 2022 Henty Machinery Field Days.

The new X9 at a glance

  • Dual separator:two 61cm rotors with an increased threshing area of 45% and separating areas of 80% for better handling high-volume crops.
  • Fast unloading:unload a full tank inabout 90 seconds – up to 5.3 bushels per second!
  • More efficient engine:6 litre engine delivers up to a 45 per cent increase in harvesting capacity, while only needing 11 per cent more horsepower than the S790.
  • 20 per cent less fuel:it’s not only the engine that delivers lower fuel costs, it’s every aspect of the design – belts, transmission, residue system, rotors and lower RPM all have a role to play in saving you money on fuel.
  • In-cab control:With the 4600 CommandCenter™ Display, you get in-cab control of the power folding unloading auger and adjustable spout for easier unloading and residue adjustments.
  • Integrated intelligence:from the integrated StarFire™ Receiver to JDLink™ Connectivity, the X9 Combine comes ready to make your harvest easier.
  • Loaded with integrated technology:X9 Combines come with a technology suite that keeps efficiency and productivity at the highest possible level. From JDLink™ connectivity, to data tools like John Deere Operations Center, to automation features like Combine Advisor, to guidance options that range from an integrated receiver for hands-free steering to automated turns and tractor/grain cart control — the X9 delivers. 

Renowned for leading the way with emerging technology, KUHN is optimising production with its Optimer XL 1200 and the VB 7100 Series. 

Designed for stubble cultivation, trash management, soil levelling and the destruction of green cover crops, KUHN's Optimer XL 12000 offers new and innovative features that will improve the efficiency and quality of work it performs. 

At 12m wide, and with the ability to be folded into 3m wide and 4m high for road transport, the Optimer XL 1200 caters for large scale operators and contractors.

With a variable working depth of 50-150mm, it’s ideal for shallow stubble cultivation even when working with heavy crop residue. 

To cater for the variation in distance off the ground across the 12m span, a consistent working depth has been guaranteed by KUHN’s ‘Steady Control’ system, adapting the five sections of the machine independent to one another. 

The Optimer XL 1200 has 96 discs with a diameter of 620mm and is limited to one disc per arm to increase material flow. 

The design also reduces the risk of blockages with a greater clearance under the disk train, and under beam between disc trains. 

KUHN’s VB 7100 Series chamber round baler can deliver a capacity of up to 30t/hours in various crop conditions. 

With the proven four belt + three roller design in the bale chamber and KUHN’s I-DENSE system, the VB 7100 can produce round bales with densities up to 140kg/m3, offering fast, secure and consistent bale formation in any crop condition, even silage.  

The VB 7100 Series also measures the moisture of the forage and automatically adapts the bale pressure depending on the different crops and crop conditions without interference of the operator.

It’s net binding system operates with active stretch technology guaranteeing consistent net tension and ensuring a sturdy bale shape. 

KUHN’s VB 7100 also features, one of the fastest tailgate operations on the market. In four seconds, a bale can be ejected and the tailgate will be closed again ready for the next bale.  

To find out more, visit Kuhn at the Henty Machinery Field Days at site 439-442 Block L or visit www.kuhn.com.au/

Kotzur Pty Ltd has a longstanding connection with the Henty Machinery Field Days that started 60 years ago, when they first exhibited at the inaugural event.

Ray Kotzur founded Modern Engineering and Construction Co Pty Ltd in 1953, after purchasing a block in Commercial St, in the township of Walla Walla. 

The early years were dedicated to building sheds, farm gates, cattle and sheep yards, water tanks, children’s play equipment (see-saws and swings), general engineering and farm repairs. 

It was only in 1962, after the development of a rolling machine to produce continuous rings, that Ray and his staff produced the first steel silo. 

Ray was keen to use continuous galvanized steel in the manufacture of his silos rather than corrugated iron sheets. 

Using one continuous piece meant less rivets and bolts, it was quicker, more cost effective and resulted in a neat job with less potential for leaks.  The first silo was delivered to David Muller, “Dosydale”, Henty. 

Demand for silos steadily increased. By the early 1970’s the company’s focus had become solely based around grain silos. As demand grew, so did production. 

Ray’s son Andrew and his wife Michelle joined the business in the 1980’s. Andrew helped drive the move to gas sealed silos with a steeper hopper cone. 

As the years went by, design and engineering systems were developed to be able to manufacture larger capacity silos that were built on site. 

Today, Kotzur is a third generation family business, with Andrew and Michelle’s son, Ben and his wife Raquel involved in the business. 

The organisation is built around an experienced workforce of almost 200 people across the country, with facilities in Walla Walla, Toowoomba, Moree and Perth.

Kotzur manufacture a diverse range of storage, handling and processing solutions for agricultural, industrial and commercial clientele. 

Kotzur are proud to design and manufacture their storage and handling equipment here in Australia. Using machines that have been custom made, Kotzur manufacture their full range of silos in Walla Walla, while the majority of their handling gear is produced in Toowoomba. 

This enables them to fully customise solutions in accordance with the particular needs of the client. The stringent Australian Standards for design are used for the basis of all Kotzur designs, and ensures clients receive quality products to be used for generations to come. 

Field days are a highlight on Kotzur’s calendar with the business making a point of attending Henty every year. 

“It is an invaluable opportunity to say hello to clients and shake their hands,” Andrew Kotzur said.

His Henty attendance strike rate got disrupted in 2020 after only having missed one field day since 1985. “It’s a given,” he said. 

 

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Henty Machinery Field Days Co-operative Limited

Phone: (02) 6929 3305

Site Address: 22 Lubkes Road, Henty NSW 2658

Postal Address: PO Box 107, HENTY NSW 2658

General Email: admin@hmfd.com.au

Site Information: applications@hmfd.com.au

Accounts: accounts@hmfd.com.au

Media: media@hmfd.com.au

Henty is located midway between Albury and Wagga Wagga on the Olympic Way